It's time for change.

Imagine a bank robbery.

There are 10 people inside the bank when a group of masked men burst through the doors, not to mention a dozen or so people on the street outside. The robbers make off with the bank’s takings just before the police arrive.

To find the robbers, who should the police question?

Imagine a bank robbery.

There are 10 people inside the bank when a group of masked men burst through the doors, not to mention a dozen or so people on the street outside. The robbers make off with the bank’s takings just before the police arrive.

To find the robbers, who should the police question?

The answer, of course, is everyone. If you don’t ask every possible witness, how can you piece together what really happened? You can’t construct a reliable narrative if you’re missing half of the information. 

History is no different.

 

If we don’t acknowledge every perspective, we are missing out on so much. 

 

Historically, we have built a narrative that reflects the experiences and perspectives of a minority.

This isn't an either/or scenario.

This isn't about rewriting history so that we replace one voice with another.

This is about integration.

Every story deserves to be told.

While some progress has already been made, there's still a long way to go. One of the big problems for historians is that they are often confronted with silence. In some cases, it's near impossible to document the experiences of a person because they left little or no trace behind. Does that mean we should give up? I don't think so. It might mean that we need a new approach or to ask different questions than we might usually ask.

 

But we should never give up.

Here's why: 

1. Over half of girls aged 11-21 believe that the role played by women in history is not represented as much as the role played by men.

​​2. 93.7% of academic historians come from White backgrounds.

3. Only 0.5% of recorded history includes women - though they make up at least half of the population.

 

​4. In the UK, only one Black woman - Mary Seacole - is commemorated with a statue.

 

​5. The focus on slavery in school history is putting Black children off the subject.

 

6. Many school teachers lack the subject knowledge, time and resources to effectively teach diverse histories.

So what can we do about it? 

The Herstorian's Manifesto 

Mission: 
Fight for equality in History and equity in History Education

1. Be Responsive

We all have biases. We all have different frames of reference - and that's okay. Let's use that as our starting point. Let's show the connectedness of past and present. Let's commit to making history relevant to young people today. 

2. Be Compassionate

Having compassion doesn't mean we suddenly start thinking Hitler was a good guy. It means that we humanise the past. We tell stories that people can relate to, not just facts and figures. Because relevance translates to better outcomes in the classroom.  

3. Be Accurate

It's time to smash the stereotypes and question the myths. It's time to challenge our sources of knowledge and promote new, inclusive ones. 

What This Manifesto Isn't:

Rewriting our history - this is not an either/or scenario.

There is room for every voice to be heard.

 

Collaborators: Click here and let's work together to make this happen.

SUPPORT THE HERSTORIAN AND JOIN THE FIGHT 

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